Pack n Send Blog

Increase in Freight Orders- Good for Houston and World Economy

Posted on Thu, Mar 10, 2011

Three is the magic number. Turkish Airlines has signed an order for three A330-200 freighters to add to its existing A330-200F and four A310 freighters.

The airline has a further 27 aircraft on order with Airbus from contracts placed in 2009 and 2010. Turkish Airlines has also signed an order for 10 passenger aircraft.

 Air cargo news reported this order on its website.  While three freighters does not seem like a high order, the fact that these orders have been placed adds to the impression that the worldwide economy is improving at a slow but steady pace.

 Pack n send is continually monitoring both air and ocean orders of equipment as a way to monitor economic improvement.

 Pack n send is located in Houston Texas. For assistance with your freight preparation, freight receiving, crating and packing please feel free to contact pack n send at 716 266 1450.

 

Tags: Shipping Freight Houston, Freight Shipping Houston, Crating and Packing Houston, Container Loading Houston, cargo shipping, Electronics Shipping Houston, Shipping Houston, Freight Forwarding Houston, Crate Houston, packing houston texas

Cargo Shipping-Innovation

Posted on Mon, Jan 24, 2011

Taken from handy shipping guide WORLDWIDE – Ever the innovators  Dhl Global Forwarding have come up with two solutions to an age old problem. Exporting or importing a car without any of the serious damage that can result even after the smallest bodywork scrape. For decades this particular cargo has been the bane of many a freight operator’s life and now refinement of a double rack system, plus a new innovative box built for motor vehicles, may well prove the answer for many.

The collapsible C3SB transport box and the double car rack facilitate the loading of vehicles and increase efficiency in using transport capacity. In addition, both systems offer protection against damage due to external factors during transport by air, sea and road, such as turbulences, heavy seas or poor roads. Both transport solutions have now been patented by the German Patent Office, (the freight forwarding side of DHL is of course a division of Deutsche Post DHL).

Racks to transport two cars within one container have of course been around a long time but the new model has a movable intermediate level enabling the car rack to be used to not only to store two sedan-sized vehicles on top of each other in a container but also two cars also need only one space in the main cargo hold of a freight aircraft.

Both systems provide for more efficient transport, and therefore increased environmental efficiency, than conventional containers. The advantages of these novel shipping concepts become evident particularly in multimodal transport. Cars no longer need to be unloaded and reloaded during combined road, sea and land transport, since the C3SB box and the car rack are equally suitable for all transport methods.

DHL automotive experts based the C3SB box on the principle of the collapsible boxes used in many households. Their sides fold inward to rest on the bottom of the box. This represents a major further improvement of efficiency compared to the previous C2SB model already successfully used. The movable walls and the cover of the so-called "Customized Car Safety Box" already provided sufficient space and the required flexibility needed when loading the vehicles and making them safe for transport. The C3SB version with its collapsible walls now enables several empty boxes to be piled on top of each other, which therefore occupy only one space during transport.

Hermann Ude, Chief Executive Officer DHL Global Forwarding, Freight said of the new systems:

"The transport box and the car rack offer clients from the automotive sector top-end solutions in terms of safety and flexibility of transport. They again underscore our comprehensive competency with respect to logistics for one of the most important industry sectors worldwide.”

Pack n send has take this article from Handy Shipping  Guide. It is another in our series of article about improvements and efficiencies  in freight and cargo shipping.

 For information about packing freight and cargo in Houston Texas, contact pack n send at  713 266 1450.

Tags: Shipping Freight Houston, cargo shipping, Packing Houston

Cargo bomb originating in Namibia -Adjustment to Cargo Shipping

Posted on Thu, Jan 20, 2011

 

As reported in Air Cargo News, the worldwide air cargo industry must be ever vigilant  when placing cargo on airplanes.

NAMIBIAN police have discovered a suspected bomb while loading the cargo hold of an Air Berlin flight departing Namibia.

“A subsequent X-ray [of the luggage] revealed batteries that were attached with wires to a detonator and a ticking clock,” the German authorities said in a statement. “Only the ongoing forensic investigation will show whether this was a live explosive.”

Thomas De Maiziere, Germany’s interior minister, said the country had been warned it would be targeted for its role in the Afghan war. “There is reason for concern, but no reason for hysteria.”

Pack n send is awaiting notice of new embargoed countries at this time for  air cargo shipping.

As we are notified, we will update our blog.

For safe air cargo shipping, or questions about air cargo, please feel free to contact pack n send at 713 266 1450.

 

Tags: Freight Shipping Houston, cargo shipping, Cargo Shipping Houston

Shipping Freight from Houston/Europe Improved Structure of Ships

Posted on Tue, Jan 18, 2011

 

EUROPE – Flagship, the Pan European maritime transport project part funded by the EU, claim they have now developed software that can forecast the condition of a ship’s hull over time to help improve the efficacy of surveys and reduce the amount of time a vessel is out of service. The consortium of various stakeholders from the freight and shipping and academic sectors say their new hull condition assessment is designed to accurately predict the condition of a vessel’s structure, coating and components, enabling ship owners and operators to schedule maintenance in a more efficient manner and thereby reduce maintenance costs while improving safety at sea.

The system, known as Flagship-HCA is intended to extend the life of the existing fleet of Tankers and Bulk Carriers by up to five years, with a 10% to 20% reduction in service repair costs for ships throughout their life-cycle. One of the primary concerns for ship owners and Class societies is that of corrosion of the ship’s structure and this is the target of the new system.

Flagship-HCA includes three primary tools which enable the ship owner and classifier to exchange hull data in real time, based on crew inspections and maintenance work as well as periodic measurement campaigns. Firstly, the toolset includes the Survey Advisor Tool (SAT) which advises surveyors where individual ships are most vulnerable and therefore where they should concentrate their investigations.

Secondly, the Hull Health Programme Advisor (HHA) optimises the survey and maintenance programme taking in to consideration the vessel’s work schedule and the predicted structural integrity of the vessel. Finally, the Corrosion Parameter Prediction Tool which takes the results of a survey or set of surveys and update a database if corrosion parameters associated with every aspect of a ship’s hull – based on observed rules and results.

Designed to assist ship owners and surveyors Flagship-HCA enables ship owners to schedule vessel maintenance and ship replacement more accurately than has been possible to date. Its objectives include not only optimising existing asset lifecycle and investment decisions but can also provide the Class Societies with more robust data upon which to base their rulings.

The project was led by the BMT Group in the UK and was supported, delivered and trialled in conjunction with Marintek of Norway; Bureau Veritas and Sirehna of France, Germanischer Lloyd of Germany and Portline - Transportes Marítimos Internacionais, of Portugal. Mr Herman de Meester, Coordinator of Flagship, commented:

“Flagship has pursued the twin objectives of reducing still further both risk and the environmental impact of the world’s commercial fleet whilst generating the opportunity for real commercial benefits. Flagship-HCA is a tangible example of the maritime industry collaborating to improve performance and efficiency in everyone’s best interests.”

By extending the life of ships, we can all help our environment.  We have reprinted this article from the  Handy  Shipping  Guide as a service to our customers.

 

For more information about shipping from Houston, Texas and freight forwarding Houston, Texas, please feel free to contact pack n send at  713 266 1450.

Delano, Jack,, 1914-, photographer.  Pennsylvania R.R. [Railroad] ore docks, unloading iron ore from a lake freighter by means of "Hulett" unloaders, Cleveland, Ohio  1943 May   1 transparency : color.  <b>Notes: </b>...

Tags: Texas, cargo shipping, Shipping Houston, Crating and packing Houston Texas

Cargo Shipping Security- Houston and the World

Posted on Fri, Dec 10, 2010

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAPack n send is posting this article  from Air  Cargo News. It is another in our series of articles about air cargo and freight shipping security. It presents  a logical argument to the question about 100 per cent air cargo screening.

 “KILLING the airfreight industry with draconian security procedures would be giving the terrorists a result they would long to see,” says Andrew Traill, managing partner of Shippers’ Voice, a logistics advocacy and information portal.

He says 100 per cent scanning of airfreight would not only harm international trade, it would be ineffective,

“The most effective way to detect and deter anyone intending to use airfreight to carry out an attack is through intelligence,” he says. “There are regulations now in the US and Europe, that require information about the freight, its origins and destination, the people handling it and its route to be sent in advance of its arrival.

“This means in practice that most air cargo carriers will not want to even take off before being sure that the freight they carry has been cleared by the security authorities.”

Traill says that enabling people in the chain to perform security checks and maintain the security through the transport chain, (themselves authorised to do so based on the systems and practices they deploy), is not a weakness of security but a strength.

“Provided the system is properly policed, this multi-tiered approach to security in air freight is far more effective than scanning everything, especially when we know the technology is not perfect, and watching the airfreight industry collapse under the weight of delays and excessive costs.”

He admits that some of these programmes are still being implemented around Europe and indeed elsewhere around the world. “But the industry and the authorities are getting their act together, and increasing the quantity, standard and variety of security procedures being implemented. Now is not the time to undermine these initiatives in any knee jerk reaction to the latest threat,” he says.

“The industry must be robust in its defence of current and developing practices or else risk facing unworkable, costly and pointless security measures which will be no better and possibly worse than what we have and are developing today.”

 For more information about air cargo and freight shipping, please feel free to contact pack n send at 713 266 1450.

Tags: Cargo Houston, cargo shipping, Cargo Loading Houston

Changes to Cargo Shipping Houston and the US

Posted on Fri, Nov 12, 2010

Changes to Cargo Shipping

Pack n send has republished this article taken from  Voice-Air, Cargo News. We are putting this in our blog as a reminder that there are different ways to protect the cargo coming into and leaving the United States, and that much work on improving these systems still need to be accomplished.

“KILLING the airfreight industry with draconian security procedures would be giving the terrorists a result they would long to see,” says Andrew Traill, managing partner of Shippers’ Voice, a logistics advocacy and information portal.

He says 100 per cent scanning of airfreight would not only harm international trade, it would be ineffective,

“The most effective way to detect and deter anyone intending to use airfreight to carry out an attack is through intelligence,” he says. “There are regulations now in the US and Europe, that require information about the freight, its origins and destination, the people handling it and its route to be sent in advance of its arrival.

“This means in practice that most air cargo carriers will not want to even take off before being sure that the freight they carry has been cleared by the security authorities.”

Traill says that enabling people in the chain to perform security checks and maintain the security through the transport chain, (themselves authorised to do so based on the systems and practices they deploy), is not a weakness of security but a strength.

“Provided the system is properly policed, this multi-tiered approach to security in air freight is far more effective than scanning everything, especially when we know the technology is not perfect, and watching the airfreight industry collapse under the weight of delays and excessive costs.”

He admits that some of these programmes are still being implemented around Europe and indeed elsewhere around the world. “But the industry and the authorities are getting their act together, and increasing the quantity, standard and variety of security procedures being implemented. Now is not the time to undermine these initiatives in any knee jerk reaction to the latest threat,” he says.

“The industry must be robust in its defence of current and developing practices or else risk facing unworkable, costly and pointless security measures which will be no better and possibly worse than what we have and are developing today.”

For more information about cargo and freight shipping, please feel free to contact pack n send at 713 266 1450.

 Some giant military cargo jet's engine.

Tags: freight shipping, Freight Shipping Houston, cargo shipping, Cargo Shipping Houston

Cargo Restrictions Added by United Kingdom, Houston and US

Posted on Wed, Nov 10, 2010

The United Kingdome has added additional security measures in response to toner  and ink cartridges coming from Yemen.

 The increased aviation security is as follows:

 For air flights both in and out of the United Kingdom,  toner and ink cartridges weighing more than seventeen point five ounces, or five hundred grams have been suspended.  The United Kingdom Department of Transportation has issued these rules. 

 If any equipment is shipped with these cartridges inside, the restriction will also apply. 

 Pack n send will try and keep their customers updated as new security measures are put into place by various countries.

 

For more information about cargo and freight shipping, please feel free to contact pack n send at 713 266 1450.

Free photo - head person pc available in our free stock photos

Tags: cargo shipping, Cargo Shipping Houston, Announcements

Shipping and Cargo Delay at Port of Houston

Posted on Mon, Oct 04, 2010

Delano, Jack,, 1914-, photographer.  Pennsylvania R.R. [Railroad] ore docks, unloading iron ore from a lake freighter by means of "Hulett" unloaders, Cleveland, Ohio  1943 May   1 transparency : color.  <b>Notes: </b>...  Pack n send is reprinting this article from today’s Houston Chronicle. Since this will directly impact both incoming and out going ships, it is important to note that there will be cargo delays at the Port of Houston this week.

 By ZAIN SHAUK
HOUSTON CHRONICLE

A set of barges crashed into an electrical tower Sunday in the Port of Houston, prompting the U.S. Coast Guard to shut down most of the nation’s second-largest maritime shipping complex, possibly until Wednesday.

A towing vessel pushing three barges of scrap metal through the Houston Ship Channel about 6 a.m. hit a 300-foot-tall electrical tower, which carries lines across the artery, said Petty Officer Richard Brahm, a spokesman for the Coast Guard. No injuries were reported.

The crash happened at the narrowest point in the waterway, leaving three-fourths of the port’s terminals inaccessible.

“Maybe if it was wider we could have got boats around it, but it’s not, so it’s a logistical problem,” Brahm said. “It’s a bad place for it to happen.”

There was no risk of electricity-related injuries or effects to the power grid, which is owned by Houston-based CenterPoint Energy, because lines in the area were deactivated prior to the crash for maintenance work, said Penny Todd, a spokeswoman for the company.

CenterPoint was in the process Sunday of moving equipment needed to clear the steel tower and cables from the waterway — work the company expects will be completed Wednesday, she said.

The 25-mile-long port complex is a major economic engine for the region and in 2009 handled more waterborne tonnage than any port in the country, according to the Port of Houston Authority.

About 60 ships carrying $322 million in goods and resources — ranging from crude oil to finished products in containers — move through the port each day, said Chief Warrant Officer Lionel Bryant, a spokesman for the Coast Guard.

19 miles closed

Items shipped through the Port of Houston move to and from destinations in every state, which could mean delays for companies with vessels in the water.

Those ships will have to drop anchor and wait until the steel electrical tower, which was propped up by the barges after the accident, is removed.

At least eight ships were waiting in an anchoring area outside the port after the crash. Five others were waiting to leave.

The Coast Guard closed 19 miles out of the 54-mile-long ship channel, leaving more than 100 terminals — including those for oil giants Shell and Valero — cut off from the sea.

Further delays possible

The few accessible terminals are mostly for container ships and will not be usable by most companies that would need other infrastructure for loading and unloading or that had planned to arrive at terminals north of the crash site, said Tom Pace, presiding officer of Houston Ship Pilots, a labor association.

Three days of backups could result in further delays, even as traffic begins moving through the port again, Pace said.
“It’s going to take probably three days to get everything back to normal after that,” he said.

Crew members from the towing vessel, the T/V Safety Quest, were removed from the boat and tested for drugs and alcohol.

It was unclear how the accident occurred, but the tower’s location has long been known to ship pilots who work in the port, Pace said.

It was one of six towers in the channel, but was the closest to the preferred waterway for traffic.
“The one problem is the tower’s really close to the navigable channel,” Pace said. “That’s probably one of the reasons it had happened.”

 

For more information about shipping cargo and freight receiving through the Port of Houston, please contact pack n send at 713 266 1450.

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Truck and Freight Shippers Misuse of Physicals-Houston not Pleased

Posted on Wed, Sep 29, 2010

 Freight Hauler Royalty Free Stock Photo  

Pack  n send is posting this article written by Ryan  Phillios at News 21  as a service to your customers. We found the entire article published on msn.com.  While the trucking industry is making improvements, it looks like the DOT still has a way to go as far as monitoring its own policies.

 

Trucker Bob Caffee needed a medical card fast. His certificate from the U.S. Department of Transportation was to expire in two days, and he was in Southern California, halfway across the country from his regular doctor. So Caffee headed to one of the medical clinics that have sprung up at truck stops across America.

The clinic in Ontario, Calif., where Caffee stopped, is housed in a small, rundown building next to a Travel Centers of America truck stop. A sign advertises "DOT Physicals" next to a picture of a red truck.

"You say, 'I need a DOT physical,'" and the assistant says, "'OK, come back here and I’ll call the doctor,'" Caffee said.

About this project

  1. This project was reported by journalism students in the Carnegie-Knight  News 21 program in collaboration with the Center for Public Integrity, a nonprofit investigative journalism organization.

The two of them checked his blood pressure, urine, breathing, hearing and vision. Caffee remembers that he had trouble reading past the top two lines of the eye chart. "I told her I wear glasses, and she OK'd me," he said, even though his driver's license didn’t say he was required to wear glasses.

The whole thing was over in 20 minutes, and Caffee emerged with a medical certificate that states he is healthy enough to drive a commercial truck for the next two years. Cost of exam: $30.

The exam Caffee underwent is required for all interstate commercial drivers. However, in many states, almost any health professional, including chiropractors, physician assistants, osteopathic doctors and advance practice nurses, can issue medical certificates for truck drivers. There are no training requirements and only minimal standards for what to check.

If a trucker is denied by one doctor, he can easily try another. There is no database to check whether medical certificates are valid, or whether a driver is "doctor shopping."

Drivers can download a medical certificate from the Internet and fill it out themselves. Others don’t bother getting a medical certificate — genuine or false. Few are ever caught. A trucker caught without a certificate is often given a fine — and allowed to drive on.

Deadly consequences
The problem of medically unqualified commercial drivers first drew national attention in 1999 when a bus driver veered off Interstate 610 near New Orleans, struck a guardrail, went through a chain-link fence, vaulted over a golf cart path and rammed into a dirt embankment, killing 22 of the 43 passengers on board.

The driver, who had a current medical certificate, had been in and out of the hospital the day before for treatment of his kidneys. He was released less than eight hours before reporting to work, according to an NTSB report. Post-accident tests were positive for marijuana and an over-the-counter sleep medication that can cause drowsiness and dizziness. A passenger reported seeing the driver "slouch down" prior to the accident.

Conclusions

  1. Findings of the News21 investigation include:
  • The National Transportation Safety Board has essentially given up on 1,952 of its safety recommendations – one of every six it has made since 1967.
  • Federal agencies, states and transportation industries are taking longer than ever to act. Over the past decade, the average number of years to implement recommendations went from 3.4 years to 5.4 years.

The accident prompted the National Transportation Safety Board to issue a series of stern recommendations in 2002 to the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration, whose primary mission is to prevent commercial motor vehicle-related fatalities and injuries.

Specifically, the board directed the FMCSA, part of the Department of Transportation, to "prevent medically unqualified drivers from operating commercial vehicles" and "establish a medical oversight program for all interstate commercial drivers."

Mitch Garber, a NTSB medical officer, said the FMCSA’s response to the board’s calls for tougher medical standards has been disappointing. The agency has addressed a few problems, but the approach has been piecemeal and largely ineffective, he said.

"It’s no more difficult for a medically unqualified driver to drive today than when the recommendation was made," Garber said.

For information on freight and cargo shipping from Houston, TX, please call pack n send at 713 266 1450.

Tags: crating packing shipping, cargo, cargo shipping, cargo containers

All Cargo Airline Assisting with flood relief in Pakistan.

Posted on Wed, Sep 15, 2010

image: Luxembourg Pakistan floods air freight cargo freight

 PAKISTAN – LUXEMBOURG – The catastrophic floods which have swept through Pakistan bringing misery to millions prompted the people of the Duchy of Luxembourg, encouraged by an appeal from the local Pakistan Consulate, to initiate a countrywide collection resulting in around 600 boxes, containing used clothes, sheets, shoes, plus tinned foods being donated.

Now Europe’s largest all-cargo airline, Cargolux, will transport these charity boxes free of charge on board its B747-400 freighter to Karachi on 14 and 21 September 2010. From Karachi, the shipment will be forwarded to the flooded areas by the local relief organization Edhi International Foundation.

Coordination and documentation were done by Cargolux’s Charity Committee at head office Luxembourg, taking care of the company’s worldwide charity activities, in line with the available space on Cargolux freighters.

Free storage room was offered by Streff, Luxembourg, who will also take care of the delivery of the boxes to the Luxair Cargo Centre, while Luxair Cargo arranges for free security screening of the Cargolux charity shipments.

On behalf of the People of Pakistan, The Honorary Consul General, Mr. Mark Samuel, extended his sincere gratitude to Cargolux Airlines, enterprise Streff, Luxair Cargo, and the People of Luxembourg at large for contributing generously with their valuable donation to help the floods affected people in Pakistan.

 

Pack n send has reprinted this article from the Handy Shipping   Guide as a service to our customers. Freight, cargo and airline companies consistently assist with disaster relief.

For information on cargo, and freight shipping from the United States, please contact pack n send at 713 266 1450.

 

Tags: freight shipping, cargo, cargo shipping, cargo containers